Urinary Control Disorder

UCD is a common condition which often occurs due to childbirth, aging, hormonal changes, surgery, chronic cough, or prostate-related issues. This occurs when the pelvic floor muscles are weak and are unable to support bladder control

Common symptoms include stress incontinence, frequent urination, urinary leakage while coughing, sneezing, laughing or exercising. Treatment starts with rapid strengthening of the pelvic floor.

Rapid strengthening of the pelvic floor

Orchard Clinic’s method combines our proprietary physical therapy programme with the latest FDA-approved advanced medical technology to stimulate pelvic floor contractions. Your consultant will tailor the protocol according to strengthen or relax your pelvic floor depending on your condition.

What is Urinary Control Disorder?

Urinary Control Disorder (UCD) is also known as urinary incontinence,  involuntary urination, weak bladder control, oris any uncontrolled leakage of urine. It is a common and distressing problem, which may have a large impact on quality of life. UCD occurs when the pelvic floor muscles are weak and unable to support healthy bladder control. 

What are some of the symptoms of UCD?

You may have UCD if you:

  • need to take frequent day or night bathroom breaks
  • urinate more than 6-8 times in a day
  • leak urine when you sneeze, cough or exercise
  • avoid exercise due to urinary incontinence
  • avoid drinking water to avoid bathroom visits
  • feel a loss of confidence due to urinary incontinence
  • use hygiene pads or adult incontinence products

What are the types of Urinary Control Disorder?

Stress incontinence

If urine leaks out when you jump, cough, or laugh, you may have stress incontinence. Any physical exertion that increases abdominal pressure also puts pressure on the bladder. The word “stress” actually refers to the physical strain associated with leakage. Although it can be emotionally distressing, the condition has nothing to do with emotion. Often only a small amount of urine leaks out. In more severe cases, the pressure of a full bladder overcomes the body’s ability to hold in urine. The leakage occurs even though the bladder muscles are not contracting and you don’t feel the urge to urinate.

Overactive bladder (urge incontinence)

If you feel a strong urge to urinate even when your bladder isn’t full, your incontinence might be related to overactive bladder, sometimes called urge incontinence. This condition occurs in both men and women and involves an overwhelming urge to urinate immediately, frequently followed by loss of urine before you can reach a bathroom. Even if you never have an accident, urgency and urinary frequency can interfere with work and a social life because of the need to keep running to the bathroom.

Mixed incontinence

If you have symptoms of both overactive bladder and stress incontinence, you likely have mixed incontinence, a combination of both types. Most women with incontinence have both stress and urge symptoms — a challenging situation. Mixed incontinence also occurs in men who have had prostate removal or surgery for an enlarged prostate, and in older people of either gender.

Overflow incontinence

If your bladder never completely empties, you might experience urine leakage, with or without feeling a need to go. Overflow incontinence occurs when something blocks urine from flowing normally out of the bladder, as in the case of prostate enlargement that partially closes off the urethra. It can also occur in both men and women if the bladder muscle becomes underactive (the opposite of an overactive bladder) so you don’t feel an urge to urinate. Eventually the bladder becomes overfilled, or distended, pulling the urethra open and allowing urine to leak out. The bladder might also spasm at random times, causing leakage. This condition is sometimes related to diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

Men are much more frequently diagnosed with overflow incontinence than women because it is often caused by prostate-related conditions. In addition to enlarged prostate, other possible causes of urine blockage include tumors, bladder stones, or scar tissue. If a woman has severe prolapse of her uterus or bladder (meaning that the organ has dropped out of its proper position), her urethra can become kinked like a bent garden hose, interfering with the flow of urine.

Nerve damage (from injuries, childbirth, past surgeries, or diseases such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or shingles) and aging often prevent the bladder muscle from contracting normally. Medications that prevent bladder muscle contraction or that make you unaware of the urge to urinate can also result in overflow incontinence.

Functional incontinence

If your urinary tract is functioning properly but other illnesses or disabilities are preventing you from staying dry, you might have what is known as functional incontinence.


For example, if an illness rendered you unaware or unconcerned about the need to find a toilet, you would become incontinent. Medications, dementia, or mental illness can decrease awareness of the need to find a toilet.

Treat Urinary Control Disorder for Women

0%

of females face urinary incontinence

0in 4

women aged 30-59 have experienced urinary leakage

0/10

do not seek help

What are the pelvic floor muscles?

The pelvic floor is made up of layers of muscle and other tissues deep within the pelvis that support the trunk. They control the flow of urine and bowel movements, and they are important for intimacy too. These layers stretch like a hammock from the tailbone at the back, to the pubic bone in front.

A woman’s pelvic floor muscles support her bladder, womb (uterus) and bowel (colon). The urine tube (front passage), the vagina and the back passage all pass through the pelvic floor muscles.

Why should women do pelvic floor muscle training?

Women of all ages need to have strong pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic floor muscles can be made weaker by:

  • not keeping them active;
  • being pregnant and having babies;
  • constipation;
  • being overweight;
  • heavy lifting;
  • coughing that goes on for a long time
  • (such as smoker’s cough, bronchitis or asthma); and
  • growing older.

Women with stress incontinence – that is, women who wet themselves when they cough, sneeze or are active – will find pelvic floor muscle training can help in getting over this problem.

For pregnant women, pelvic floor muscle training will help the body cope with the growing weight of the baby. Healthy, fit muscles before the baby is born will mend more easily after the birth.

After the birth of your baby, you should begin pelvic floor muscle training as soon as you can. Always try to brace your pelvic floor muscles (squeeze up and hold) each time before you cough, sneeze or lift the baby.

As women grow older, the pelvic floor muscles need to stay strong because hormone changes after menopause can affect bladder control. As well as this, the pelvic floor muscles change and may get weak. A pelvic floor muscle training plan can help to lessen the effects of menopause on pelvic support and bladder control.

Pelvic floor muscle training may also help women who have the urgent need to pass urine more often (called urge incontinence).

How can i treat Urinary Control Disorder?

UCD occurs when the pelvic floor muscles are weak and unable to support healthy bladder control. Therapy can help regain control through re-education of pelvic floor muscles, bladder retraining, strengthening, and use of electrical stimulation and/or biofeedback – without the need for surgery.

Can Urinary Control Disorder be treated?

Yes, it can be treated with physical therapy and the help of advanced medical technology.

Customers have seen:

  • 67% reduced hygienic pads
  • 100% better awareness of pelvic floor muscles
  • 95% improved their quality of life
  • 40% reported they’re able to properly contract pelvic floor muscles
  • 12% longer period between urination

Treat Urinary Control Disorder for Men

0%

of men face urinary incontinence

0out of 10

men who had prostate surgery suffer from UCD

0/10

do not seek help

What are the pelvic floor muscles?

The pelvic floor is made up of layers of muscle and other tissues deep within the pelvis that support the trunk. They control the flow of urine and bowel movements, and they are important for intimacy too. These layers stretch like a hammock from the tailbone at the back, to the pubic bone in front.

A man’s pelvic floor muscles support his bladder and bowel. The urine tube and the back passage all pass through the pelvic floor muscles. Your pelvic floor muscles help you to control your bladder and bowel. They also help sexual function.

Why should men do pelvic floor muscle training?

Men of all ages need to have strong pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic floor muscles can be made weaker by:

  • surgery for bladder or bowel problems;
  • constipation;
  • being overweight;
  • heavy lifting;
  • coughing that goes on for a long time (such as smoker’s cough, bronchitis or asthma); or
  • not being fit.

Men with stress incontinence – men who wet themselves when they cough, sneeze or are active – will find pelvic floor muscle training can help in getting over this problem.

Pelvic floor muscle training may also be of use for men who have an urgent need to pass urine more often (called urge incontinence).

Men who have problems with bowel control might find pelvic floor muscle training can help the muscle that closes the back passage. This muscle is one of the pelvic floor muscles.

How can i treat Urinary Incontinence?

UCD occurs when the pelvic floor muscles are weak and unable to support healthy bladder control. Therapy can help regain control through re-education of pelvic floor muscles, bladder retraining, strengthening, and use of electrical stimulation and/or biofeedback – without the need for surgery.

Can Urinary Control Disorder be treated?

Yes, it can be treated with physical therapy and the help of advanced medical technology.

Customers have seen:

  • 67% reduced hygienic pads
  • 100% better awareness of pelvic floor muscles
  • 95% improved their quality of life
  • 40% reported they’re able to properly contract pelvic floor muscles
  • 12% longer period between urination
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Orchard Clinic is a specialised centre combining advanced medical technology and physical conditioning to help clients achieve healthy, pain-free lifestyles.

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302 Orchard Road
Tong Building #09-01A
Singapore 238862

E: method@orchardclinic.com
T: 65 6235 4560
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